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 Post subject: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 5:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2014 12:54 pm
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Hi guys,
I'm new to this forum, but thought I would give it a go. I have been given a rescued long billed corella to rehabiliate which has plucked over 50% of it's feathers out. His whole body and top of wings are totally naked. He is obviously a pet, talks well, found wondering in town. We live on a farm and I have him in my aviary which houses our pet pink & grey. They keep a healthy distance from each other, actually totally ignore each other. Aviary is 3m x 3m x 4m high, under the shade of a gum tree, near the house and is full of tree branches, toys, hollow logs etc. He's fed a variety of seed, as well as wild seed, grasses, fruit bits etc.

My issue is that I expected without the boredom I'm presuming he's come from, he would start to grow back his feathers, but he's still plucking and shakes for no reason whatsoever (definitely not cold as we are in the middle of a heat wave). I've had him nearly 3 weeks and he's still pulling feathers, and has even started to self mutilate by biting the bare skin on his chest.

What can I do to help him back to pristine health. He's otherwise happy, shower's under the sprinkler, screeches as he hangs from ropes, and talks constantly. Loves people as any time you go near his cage, he's straight at you talking.

Any help appreciated. He has had a spray on lice treatment before I was given him.

Linda


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Mon Mar 03, 2014 5:37 pm 
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Location: Canberra
Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD)



Cause:
It is an infectious virus. This was confirmed by studies undertaken by Dr David Pass et al from 1984 to 1987 but this is not a new disease – it has been around for several decades (at least).

Affected Species:
Many species of Australasian psittacine birds and several species of African and South American psittacines are known to be susceptible and there is no reason to believe that all species aren’t susceptible.

Incidence in Captive and Wild Populations:
The disease is common in captive cockatoos of the genus Cacatua including the sulphur-crested cockatoo, galah, pink cockatoo, little corella, long-billed corella, lesser sulphur-crested cockatoo, triton cockatoo, and Goffin’s cockatoo. PBFD occurs uncommonly in the cockatiel and has been diagnosed in the gang-gang cockatoo. The disease is also extremely common in aviary collections of budgerigars and lovebirds.

PBFD occurs in wild psittacine birds in Australia. A prevalence of 10-20% has been reported in sulphur-crested cockatoos in South-Eastern Australia. PBFD also occurs in wild galahs and little corellas, rainbow lorikeets, king parrots, 28 parrots and red-capped parrots.

This disease also limits the success of breeding of the endangered species in captivity such as the orange-bellied parrot. A breeding program in Tasmania has been very successful but now that PBFD has appeared in the captive birds they won’t be returned to the wild as originally intended for fear of wiping out what is left of the wild population.

Transmission:
It is probable that natural infection is by the oral route but carriage of the virus on the eggshell is a distinct possibility. In aviaries the incidence of disease increases as the breeding season progresses and the same nests are used for successive clutches of eggs – this appears to be because the amount of virus, which is shed in faeces and feather dander, builds up in the nest. The younger a bird is when it is exposed to the virus, the greater the chance that it will develop the disease and the more severe the disease is likely to be. As birds get older they become more resistant. Species in the genus Cacatua are more likely to develop severe disease than other genera of psittacine birds.

What the Virus Does:
a. The virus causes death of the epidermal cells of the feathers and beak which upsets the normal pattern of growth of these structures.
b. The virus causes reduced function of the immune system.

Symptoms:
Cockatoos commonly have severe feather loss, beak rot and suffer from impaired immunity such that they are likely to contract other infections. The smaller parrots rarely have beak involvement, commonly may only lose flight feathers and don’t seem to be affected by immunosuppression. Mildly affected parrots may recover clinically but they still could be a source of virus for other birds.

Recovery:
The prognosis for recovery of feather growth is poor. Some birds live for long periods with poor feathering, whereas others suddenly or progressively lose their appetite, become depressed, lose weight and die. In some cases degeneration of the beak impairs eating and leads to starvation.

Treatment:
There is no treatment or vaccine available for the control of PBFD. The current recommendation to vets is that infected birds be destroyed but in the case of pet birds this can be avoided until the bird begins to experience obvious pain and discomfort. In aviaries some control is achieved by strict attention to hygiene (cleaning and disinfecting nests between clutches) and culling affected birds. When purchasing a bird pay particular attention to the plumage and have any feather abnormalities, such as a dirty or greasy appearance, examined by a veterinarian to obtain an accurate diagnosis.

Source of info Burke's Backyard http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/factsh ... sease/6406

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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 8:19 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 02, 2014 6:13 am
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Do you have any pictures?


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Tue Mar 04, 2014 1:08 pm 
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Will take pics tonight and post. Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Wed Mar 05, 2014 7:37 am 
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Joined: Sun Sep 09, 2012 5:39 pm
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Location: Salisbury
I think a few parrots also get this and the can loose all their feathers

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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 1:29 pm 
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Oh my goodness looks like my friend Andy Oh my he is so shocking to look at


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2014 6:34 pm 
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Photo's as requested.


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:45 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 8:11 pm
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Location: Sitting in front of the Puta
Its got PBFD for sure, you need to consult a vet I think





LooLoo


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 10:32 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 11, 2009 3:41 pm
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Not all birds with beak and feather lose all their feathers, it can be that of course but it can also be a nervous condition. A bird that has been handraised and loved then left for long periods of time on its own often pull out their feathers due to boredom (as you already stated) or being nervous. Think about having constant company for most of your young life then being left totally alone. One way to approach it is keep him on a stand in the day time near you, take him from room to room if you can and only cage him at night, remove all black sunflower seeds and other oily seeds from his diet they make the feathers easier to pull. Lots and lots of attention can curb this but as with all things it can be a habit and habits that have gone this far are hard to break but not impossible.


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 Post subject: Re: Long billed corella in distress
PostPosted: Fri Mar 07, 2014 2:28 pm 
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SOme use veg oil to stop them plucking their own feathers

Maybe you can try that

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