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 Post subject: TRAINING YOUR BIRDS FOR SHOWING
PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:05 am 
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Just thought this might come in handy for anyone wanting to start showing their birds and not sure how to go abt it = Sticky???


TRAINING YOUR BIRDS FOR SHOWING

How well your bird places in a show depends on its condition, its disposition, how closely it conforms to the standard description for its breed and variety, and how it compares with other birds in its class at the show.
Select your birds early. Don’t pull them out of a pen the day before the sow. [I believe preparing a bird to show starts when they hatch from the egg]. Always have backup birds just incase the birds you have selected can’t be shown on the day. Allow sufficient time for preparation and training. Birds should be trained and prepared to display their best qualities. Birds unaccustomed to a cage do not ‘show’ to their best advantage unless trained beforehand.
Getting birds accustomed to a cage is a simple process if started early. Start about 2-3 weeks before the show. Place each bird in a cage similar to ones used by poultry shows. A large fowl should be used to a show pen of 24” X 24”. Handle each bird 2 or 3 times a day in a manner similar to that used in judging. Always feed the bird after training with something they like. Start by putting the feed at the front of the cage, then try hand feeding, by holding the food on the bars of the cage. In time the bird will move forward to the front of the cage when someone walks up to the cage. This is good when they are being judge; there is nothing worse than a bird frightened in the corner at the back of the cage.
There are 3 steps to safely remove a bird from a cage:
Approach the cage slowly, open the door quietly and prepare to remove the bird, headfirst. Manoeuvre the bird until it stands with its head to your right or left. Then reach into the cage across the back of the bird with your right hand, firmly but gently grasp the most distant wing at the shoulder. Keep the wing folded and close to the bird’s body.
Rotate the bird in the cage so that its head is pointing towards you and open the door.
Slide your free hand, palm upwards, underneath the bird’s breast. Simultaneously, grasp the bird’s right leg [just above the hock joint] between your thumb and index finger while clasping the left leg between the second and third fingers. This places your index and second fingers between the bird’s legs. The breast bone should be resting upon the palm of your hand.
Bring the bird out of the cage head first, keeping its head towards you. After holding the bird for a while, open the wings to examine various parts of the body just as you would if you were judging the bird yourself. Always return the bird to the cage head first and lower it gently to the cage floor. When accustomed to this confinement and handling, the bird will respond by presenting a good appearance to the judge. Many entries of good merit and never seriously considered by the judge because they have not been trained. Frightened birds tend to stand in a crouched rather than normal position, thus their true type is not revealed to the judge. Birds unaccustomed to handling may struggle when examined. Any of these things will give the judge unfavourable impressions. Therefore, it is recommended that you train your birds to become used to a show pen.
Note: a tip to use in the training room is to have a radio on. The birds get used to noise and voices, because at a show there is plenty of noise in the poultry pavilion.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:06 pm 
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Hi ooz, excellent info, you beat us to the punch :-D Defiantly worthy of a Sticky.




Thanks
P.A :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 5:46 pm 
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Location: North Maclean 1/2 between Brisbane and Beaudesert
Thank you we could add other relevant info as well couldn't we like blue boxes etc etc etc.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 24, 2008 7:07 pm 
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Location: the riverina . country n.s.w
some great info there mate

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 25, 2008 12:24 am 
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she reads - she smiles - she curtsies :lol:
Nah seriously - I hadn't seen it anywhere and thought it might be good to have posted for reference

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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2008 6:49 pm 
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Really great post, just had one little question

Quote:
This places your index and second fingers between the bird’s legs. The breast bone should be resting upon the palm of your hand.


For larger birds, do they ever get held in different ways? I find it very easy with the bantams, by my Plymouth rooster is -really- heavy :lol: :lol: :lol:


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 Post subject: Re: TRAINING YOUR BIRDS FOR SHOWING
PostPosted: Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:31 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 12:58 am
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Location: NSW
That is some good information for the young ones new to exhibition poultry.



All the best
Brahma


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Mon Mar 23, 2009 8:07 am 
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Ajackson wrote:
Really great post, just had one little question

Quote:
This places your index and second fingers between the bird’s legs. The breast bone should be resting upon the palm of your hand.


For larger birds, do they ever get held in different ways? I find it very easy with the bantams, by my Plymouth rooster is -really- heavy :lol: :lol: :lol:


You should try doing it with some of my Orps = largest to date = 10.82kg

I really ought to have put in there - for large and Xlarge breeds use yr other hand to assist in holding the bird until it is out of the cage then if necessary raise one of yr legs supporting it on a ledge or bench [or cross beam found under a lot of cages at shows] and rest bird on thigh for examination = you will see a number of judges do this = :oops: dopey me!! I see it but dont write abt it!!!

Brahma = I was actually thinking abt young ones when I typed this thinking 'most' but not all start with bantam or smaller breeds

County Lodge wrote:
Thank you we could add other relevant info as well couldn't we like blue boxes etc etc etc.

CL - Thank you for including this bit = much appreciated :-D - just another example of I see it but dont write abt it :roll: so ANY and ALL other tips added here will be great :-D

and we have now seen that this is a good starting point to add to

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 Post subject: Re: TRAINING YOUR BIRDS FOR SHOWING
PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2010 6:42 am 
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I've read this a few times now but I am in the process of training a team of 9 and just read it again wanted to say thanks and how good it is a_bravo.gif


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 Post subject: Re: TRAINING YOUR BIRDS FOR SHOWING
PostPosted: Tue Oct 05, 2010 12:02 am 
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All I can say is that it helps if the chicken is use to being handled.
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