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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:23 am 
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grabby wrote:
Why are they called green for? hard to see any green?

Yep very green on parts in the sun its like a hue


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:25 am 
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Gallus wrote:
It looks interesting. I haven't seen chooks like this before. Are they a rare breed?Whereabouts do these particular type of junglefowl originate from?


Green junglefowl
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Green junglefowl

Green Junglefowl (Gallus varius) (7936877492).jpg

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification edit

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Genus: Gallus
Species: G. varius

Binomial name

Gallus varius

Shaw, 1798

Gallus distribution.jpg
Gallus varius
G. gallus (sympatric)
G. lafayettii
G. sonneratii

The green junglefowl (Gallus varius), also known as Javan junglefowl, forktail or green Javanese junglefowl, is a medium-sized (up to 75 cm long) bird in the pheasant family Phasianidae.


Description

The colouration of the green junglefowl is sexually dimorphic. The male's plumage is dark and blackish at a distance. A closer view reveals an iridescent mantle of gleaming scales reminiscent in colour and pattern to those seen in the ocellated turkey and green peafowl. Each scale is vivid blue at its base and moves through various shades of gold and bronzed green. Specialized plumes framing the throat of the male green junglefowl are highly light-reflective and appear violet at the proximal and sky blue at the distal edges. The lesser coverts of the wing are a striking burnt orange with bronzed black centers. The distal edges of the greater secondary coverts are vivid ocher.

Like the related red junglefowl, the breast and ventral regions are a dense, light-absorbing black. Like its closer relative the Sri Lankan junglefowl, the male green junglefowl exhibits vivid 'windows' of bare facial skin that contrast against the dark scarlet red of the face. The green junglefowl exhibits an ice blue center in its comb. A region of electric yellow facial skin extends below each ear, delineating the plumed hackles from gular lappet. Its head is topped by a light blue comb, which turns purple or red towards the top. Its wattle is also of the same colour but is bordered with blue on the edges and yellow closer to the throat. The female is mostly brown with occasional green feathers and has no comb.

female
Distribution and habitat

The green junglefowl is endemic to Java, Bali, Lombok, Komodo, Flores, Rinca and small islands linking Java with Flores, Indonesia. It has been introduced to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands where there is a small wild population. It is found from a natural altitude of 0 – 2000 m in subtropical/tropical lowland moist forest, shrubland and arable land, and has been seen flying from island to island in its native range, where it lives and breeds along coastal areas.

Behaviour

The green junglefowl usually lives in groups of two to five in the wild led by a dominant male, who takes the flock to feed and drink and then back into the cover of the forest. In the night the flock roosts in bamboo stands at 15–20 feet above the forest floor. In the breeding season the dominant males in each flock are challenged by other males without flocks. The two males clap their wings and crow loudly while fighting each other with their spurs.

Relationship with humans

The green junglefowl is being maintained and increasingly bred in captivity as its genetic diversity is disappearing. This is because these birds are bred with domestic chickens by many people, producing a hybrid known as the bekisar. The bekisar has become very popular in the East Java province and has become a mascot of the area.

The captive green junglefowl requires warm aviaries with lots of foliage and cover due to their shy nature and are fed with grains and seeds, as well as fruit and insects as these are the same type of food they would feed on in the wild. This bird has also been known for a long time as a pet animal because of its beauty and unique call.

Status and conservation

The green junglefowl is evaluated as least concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:26 am 
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Location: Brisbane Qld
mycoola wrote:
grabby wrote:
Why are they called green for? hard to see any green?

I think they are in the sun moor green I guess

Yep mine have a nice green sheen


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 9:56 am 
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Posts: 132
Pete78 wrote:
grabby wrote:
Why are they called green for? hard to see any green?

Yep very green on parts in the sun its like a hue

Nice I wish I could have them


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Thu Oct 18, 2018 9:56 am 
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Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:36 pm
Posts: 132
Pete78 wrote:
Gallus wrote:
It looks interesting. I haven't seen chooks like this before. Are they a rare breed?Whereabouts do these particular type of junglefowl originate from?


Green junglefowl
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Green junglefowl

Green Junglefowl (Gallus varius) (7936877492).jpg

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification edit

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Genus: Gallus
Species: G. varius

Binomial name

Gallus varius

Shaw, 1798

Gallus distribution.jpg
Gallus varius
G. gallus (sympatric)
G. lafayettii
G. sonneratii

The green junglefowl (Gallus varius), also known as Javan junglefowl, forktail or green Javanese junglefowl, is a medium-sized (up to 75 cm long) bird in the pheasant family Phasianidae.


Description

The colouration of the green junglefowl is sexually dimorphic. The male's plumage is dark and blackish at a distance. A closer view reveals an iridescent mantle of gleaming scales reminiscent in colour and pattern to those seen in the ocellated turkey and green peafowl. Each scale is vivid blue at its base and moves through various shades of gold and bronzed green. Specialized plumes framing the throat of the male green junglefowl are highly light-reflective and appear violet at the proximal and sky blue at the distal edges. The lesser coverts of the wing are a striking burnt orange with bronzed black centers. The distal edges of the greater secondary coverts are vivid ocher.

Like the related red junglefowl, the breast and ventral regions are a dense, light-absorbing black. Like its closer relative the Sri Lankan junglefowl, the male green junglefowl exhibits vivid 'windows' of bare facial skin that contrast against the dark scarlet red of the face. The green junglefowl exhibits an ice blue center in its comb. A region of electric yellow facial skin extends below each ear, delineating the plumed hackles from gular lappet. Its head is topped by a light blue comb, which turns purple or red towards the top. Its wattle is also of the same colour but is bordered with blue on the edges and yellow closer to the throat. The female is mostly brown with occasional green feathers and has no comb.

female
Distribution and habitat

The green junglefowl is endemic to Java, Bali, Lombok, Komodo, Flores, Rinca and small islands linking Java with Flores, Indonesia. It has been introduced to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands where there is a small wild population. It is found from a natural altitude of 0 – 2000 m in subtropical/tropical lowland moist forest, shrubland and arable land, and has been seen flying from island to island in its native range, where it lives and breeds along coastal areas.

Behaviour

The green junglefowl usually lives in groups of two to five in the wild led by a dominant male, who takes the flock to feed and drink and then back into the cover of the forest. In the night the flock roosts in bamboo stands at 15–20 feet above the forest floor. In the breeding season the dominant males in each flock are challenged by other males without flocks. The two males clap their wings and crow loudly while fighting each other with their spurs.

Relationship with humans

The green junglefowl is being maintained and increasingly bred in captivity as its genetic diversity is disappearing. This is because these birds are bred with domestic chickens by many people, producing a hybrid known as the bekisar. The bekisar has become very popular in the East Java province and has become a mascot of the area.

The captive green junglefowl requires warm aviaries with lots of foliage and cover due to their shy nature and are fed with grains and seeds, as well as fruit and insects as these are the same type of food they would feed on in the wild. This bird has also been known for a long time as a pet animal because of its beauty and unique call.

Status and conservation

The green junglefowl is evaluated as least concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.


Wow you know your jungle fowls Pete a_bravo.gif a_bravo.gif


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 10:57 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2015 1:07 pm
Posts: 80
Location: NSW
Pete78 wrote:
What are you thoughts on this fella

Got 4 trios coming in 1 week

Hope they are of show quality?

Attachment:
greenjunglefowl.png

Pete, you would have got your 4 trios by now. Can you post any pics of them?
Have you had any luck breeding them yet?
Do you mind telling us who you got your stock from?


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:19 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2018 5:55 am
Posts: 13
Location: Brisbane Qld
Gallus wrote:
Pete78 wrote:
What are you thoughts on this fella

Got 4 trios coming in 1 week

Hope they are of show quality?

Attachment:
greenjunglefowl.png

Pete, you would have got your 4 trios by now. Can you post any pics of them?
Have you had any luck breeding them yet?
Do you mind telling us who you got your stock from?

Hey man, yep got 8 chicks growing through and heaps of firtile eggs under bantam chooks sp gluck.gif
Can take pics man but when my iphone is fixed well when the camera is I dropped it dam it
cant say who


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:20 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2018 5:55 am
Posts: 13
Location: Brisbane Qld
grabby wrote:
Pete78 wrote:
Gallus wrote:
It looks interesting. I haven't seen chooks like this before. Are they a rare breed?Whereabouts do these particular type of junglefowl originate from?


Green junglefowl
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Green junglefowl

Green Junglefowl (Gallus varius) (7936877492).jpg

Conservation status

Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)[1]

Scientific classification edit

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Genus: Gallus
Species: G. varius

Binomial name

Gallus varius

Shaw, 1798

Gallus distribution.jpg
Gallus varius
G. gallus (sympatric)
G. lafayettii
G. sonneratii

The green junglefowl (Gallus varius), also known as Javan junglefowl, forktail or green Javanese junglefowl, is a medium-sized (up to 75 cm long) bird in the pheasant family Phasianidae.


Description

The colouration of the green junglefowl is sexually dimorphic. The male's plumage is dark and blackish at a distance. A closer view reveals an iridescent mantle of gleaming scales reminiscent in colour and pattern to those seen in the ocellated turkey and green peafowl. Each scale is vivid blue at its base and moves through various shades of gold and bronzed green. Specialized plumes framing the throat of the male green junglefowl are highly light-reflective and appear violet at the proximal and sky blue at the distal edges. The lesser coverts of the wing are a striking burnt orange with bronzed black centers. The distal edges of the greater secondary coverts are vivid ocher.

Like the related red junglefowl, the breast and ventral regions are a dense, light-absorbing black. Like its closer relative the Sri Lankan junglefowl, the male green junglefowl exhibits vivid 'windows' of bare facial skin that contrast against the dark scarlet red of the face. The green junglefowl exhibits an ice blue center in its comb. A region of electric yellow facial skin extends below each ear, delineating the plumed hackles from gular lappet. Its head is topped by a light blue comb, which turns purple or red towards the top. Its wattle is also of the same colour but is bordered with blue on the edges and yellow closer to the throat. The female is mostly brown with occasional green feathers and has no comb.

female
Distribution and habitat

The green junglefowl is endemic to Java, Bali, Lombok, Komodo, Flores, Rinca and small islands linking Java with Flores, Indonesia. It has been introduced to the Cocos (Keeling) Islands where there is a small wild population. It is found from a natural altitude of 0 – 2000 m in subtropical/tropical lowland moist forest, shrubland and arable land, and has been seen flying from island to island in its native range, where it lives and breeds along coastal areas.

Behaviour

The green junglefowl usually lives in groups of two to five in the wild led by a dominant male, who takes the flock to feed and drink and then back into the cover of the forest. In the night the flock roosts in bamboo stands at 15–20 feet above the forest floor. In the breeding season the dominant males in each flock are challenged by other males without flocks. The two males clap their wings and crow loudly while fighting each other with their spurs.

Relationship with humans

The green junglefowl is being maintained and increasingly bred in captivity as its genetic diversity is disappearing. This is because these birds are bred with domestic chickens by many people, producing a hybrid known as the bekisar. The bekisar has become very popular in the East Java province and has become a mascot of the area.

The captive green junglefowl requires warm aviaries with lots of foliage and cover due to their shy nature and are fed with grains and seeds, as well as fruit and insects as these are the same type of food they would feed on in the wild. This bird has also been known for a long time as a pet animal because of its beauty and unique call.

Status and conservation

The green junglefowl is evaluated as least concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.


Wow you know your jungle fowls Pete a_bravo.gif a_bravo.gif


Thanks I did it for that guy Gallus hes never heard of them so helpin out with info


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl opinons
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2018 11:23 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 01, 2018 5:55 am
Posts: 13
Location: Brisbane Qld
Andy V wrote:
100/10 for him WHAT A BEAUTY [smilie=a_holycrap.gif] [smilie=a_holycrap.gif] [smilie=a_holycrap.gif] [smilie=a_holycrap.gif] best in aust I would say by far

the guy I got em off has heaps and better colour than that one


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 Post subject: Re: Green Junglefowl
PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2018 12:10 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2015 1:07 pm
Posts: 80
Location: NSW
Pete78 wrote:
Gallus wrote:
Pete, you would have got your 4 trios by now. Can you post any pics of them?
Have you had any luck breeding them yet?
Do you mind telling us who you got your stock from?

Hey man, yep got 8 chicks growing through and heaps of firtile eggs under bantam chooks sp gluck.gif
Can take pics man but when my iphone is fixed well when the camera is I dropped it dam it
cant say who

Cheers Pete. Good to hear you've had some success.
I look forward to seeing some pics when you get your phone fixed.


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